Tag Archives: Fasting

Fasting Week Two Thoughts

21 Jul

As-salam alaikum. About two weeks ago the entire Muslim ummah began our fasting. SubhanAllah, it’s been great and I’ve been able to pass through the days and take full advantage of them.

One of the things that concerned me the most wasn’t the fasting, but how I would manage my time in regards to reading the Qur’an, reading other Islamic books and reciting and trying to memorize parts of the Qur’an.

Surprisingly it’s gone quite well and I’ve succeeded so far in reading one juz of the Qur’an daily as well and having plenty of time for other things. What I like to do is read some Qur’an before or after my prayers, so that way I can have more dhikr or remembrance in Allah throughout the day.

Since I’m the only Muslim in my household, I was worried if I would be able to wake up every morning for suhoor. I wasn’t much of a morning person before reverting and even as a Muslim we all struggle to wake up for fajr. But Alhamdulillah I have woken up every morning on time, and have been able to have my suhoor or breakfast every day.

A week ago my father came to visit us. My parents are divorced and he lives about 4 hours away, so he always tries to visit us every 2 weeks. I was really hoping he would have come the Sunday before Ramadan began, but he ended up coming right in the middle of it all. I wasn’t concerned about having to fast and going with them to eat, but how was I going to tell him I was fasting? He doesn’t even know I’m Muslim, and quite frankly I’m not prepared to tell him it all just yet. My relationship with my father isn’t the best and since we barely see him, I don’t like to share much with him.

The smells were tantalizing. We decided to go to a mall in San José and I do have to admit my mouth was watering the whole time. However, after a while I got used to it and even forgot about the hunger. He was really worried why I wasn’t eating; he offered me everything there was, from chicken to chili to ice cream to even some mangos at a food stand there.

Finally, I told him in front of my brother, who didn’t know I was fasting, either. You see, I’m not going to go around telling everyone that I am. It’s something very personal and we fast to get closer to Allah, to control our bodily desires and to remember the poor and needy. It’s not to tell the entire world that you are fasting. Besides, they won’t understand, especially if they’re Christian. I did have to tell my mother as I knew she would get worried seeing me not eat all day (especially since I love to cook and make really delicious meals at lunchtime hehe).

So there I was, trying to explain to my father I was fasting.

Nobody really fasts here. There’s this so-called “fasting” during lent in Catholic religion where you abstain from meat for one entire day. Oh, and you can eat fish if you want instead. So, it’s not fasting for me. It’s just a day where you decide to be a vegetarian, but then decide not to and have fish instead.

So I was really worried what he would think. Would he think I was crazy? Or would he scold me and start blaming my mom about all this? I mean I’m 21 but he still doesn’t see me like an adult. But Alhamdulillah he took it quite well and even made a joke about it, how fasting was only for healthy people since he is a diabetic and wouldn’t be able to fast for too long.

Once I got home my mom asked right away what he said. I guess she has this idea in her mind that he would get angry at me or something. I didn’t mention to her that I hadn’t told him I was Muslim. I mean I did say quite clearly “in Islam…” but I don’t know if he associated that with his daughter being a Muslim or not. He didn’t ask any questions, so I didn’t bother to explain to him my personal decisions.

So Alhamdulillah Allah has truly been listening to my du’aas. Of course He always have, but I had taken it all for granted until past experiences that have shown me the mercy of Allah. We are truly blessed to be Muslim, if only others could realize this.

The rest of my fasting has gone quite well. Please share your own personal experiences on the comment section if you’d like.

Strangely, I really don’t get hungry when maghrib comes. I know it’s strange, as everyone is gorging themselves with food, but I don’t know why I don’t get hungry. Maybe it has to do with the fact that maghrib here is at 6:00 p.m. and everywhere else it’s around 8:00 or 9:00. But honestly I don’t feel hungry even at that time. Do you get really hungry when maghrib comes? Let me know if it’s not just me that this happens to.

One night a cousin came, so I broke my fast with some water and started to prepare some food afterwards. We ended up having dinner around 8:30 p.m. and I really wasn’t feeling like extremely hungry. I don’t know, maybe it’s because I have my mind on other things and not so concerned about the hunger.

May Allah reward you this Ramadan and bless us and protect us from the evils of Shaytaan. May Allah accept our fasting and our salat, and insha’Allah may He reward us Jannah. Ameen.

Chao!

Fasting Day Two thoughts

10 Jul

Happy Ramadan to all! I myself started fasting yesterday, so today’s fasting quite surprisingly has felt a bit more difficult. Maybe due to the fact that my cousins from the states came over yesterday and spending all afternoon with them made me forget about the hunger and thirst.

It was only during that last hour before breaking my fast that I got a bit light headed and really started to feel the effects of not eating.

What really bothered me the first day were the headaches during the afternoon. I’ve read that’s due to dehydration, so today I drank two cups of water instead of just one to ensure that I don’t get them that badly today. Insha’Allah.

Needless to mention, my mother wasn’t very supportive about this yesterday. I was helping her cook last night, and it was only about 10 minutes till I could break my fast that she had to ruin it all for me. I was telling her what a sacrifice it is to fast and all the reward you get from it.

Her reply, you may ask? “I don’t find the logic in it. For me it’s useless.”

Way to go mother. Way to kill all my happiness for ikftar. Seriously, couldn’t you have saved that answer until after I had eaten?

I felt so sad, like a huge knot in my throat, after seeing her reaction. She has never fasted a day in her life, how can she ever know what it’s like to fast and all the hunger pains you go through?

Even when I told her that she didn’t know what it’s like to fast, she answered the contrary and said, “Oh, I have.”

Yes, let’s think for a moment you have, I thought to myself, but not for this many hours a day. And especially not for the sake of Allah. Maybe you’ve done if for a doctor’s appointment, or to lose weight, but I knew she has never done it for God. She even said to me how silly it is to fast for God.

I broke my fast with some water, ate enough to get me a bit full, and left to pray Maghrib. Alhamdulillah I didn’t say anything to her, even though the tears were inevitable. Her attitude towards me is pretty hard to deal with to be honest, but I know she speaks out of her ignorance towards Islam.

Paradise lies at the feet of your mother. No matter what your mother may say, what insult she may throw at you, or what nasty comment is directed to you, just keep your cool and remain silent. You don’t want to end up fighting with her over something only you can truly feel inside.

Well enough about that.

What I really wanted to concentrate on is the mental part. Instead of making it a fasting focused on the hunger (and all the whining you do internally), I’ve organized my time on spending as much of it on the Qur’an.

Seeing all these posts about the physical part of Ramadan, which is abstaining from food and drink and sexual intercourse during the daylight hours, I’ve felt there isn’t enough emphasis on our own selves about the main purpose of Ramadan.

Today I’m on the 3rd juz (section) of the Qur’an. I started reading the Qur’an on Monday, began my fasting Tuesday, and now I’m on the third part as planned Alhamdulillah.

Yesterday’s part was very intriguing. It talked about fasting and what is prescribed for us.

This morning, right after fajr I sat down and read about 8 pages of the first juz. The ayat that I liked was Ayat ul Kursi. The message behind it is incredible;  it is the basic understanding of who is Allah and where is Allah. I’m no scholar on this, but if you’d like to find a tasfeer on this ayat please do, as it is very important to understand what we are saying as we recite.

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Also, there is a tasfeer on Surah al Mulk on SistersOfSunnah.org today at 2:00 p.m. Costa Rican time (4:00 p.m. EST) if you’d like to join.

May this Ramadan be an opportunity for you to ask Allah (subhana wa ta’aala) for forgiveness and seek his refuge from Shaytaan.

Ameen.

What are your goals for this Ramadan?

9 Jul

ramadan-mubarak

Ramadan Mubarak to all! As opposed to what the masjid here has confirmed of Ramadan beginning tomorrow, it has been approved by numerous organizations here in the American Continent and other parts of the world that the moon sighting was last night and that Ramadan has officially started on our side of the world. Subhanallah!

I really pray to Allah that we can take the most out of this Ramadan, whether you were raised a Muslim, or have reverted to Islam, Ramadan is still the same sacred and holy month worldwide. I think that many reverts learn to really appreciate this month because we know what it’s like to not be Muslim, and to not worship Allah (subhana wa ta’aala) often. As a Christian, I used to skip attending church on Sunday just out of laziness because I knew there wasn’t any bad outcome of it if I didn’t go. As opposed to this belief, Muslim men are obliged to attend Jummah prayer at the masjid because of the great reward there is behind it.

We all should learn to not take for granted Ramadan. Sometimes we want to do so much that we can’t really stick to our goals. As a means to facilitate this for you, I’ve decided to write down the three main goals you should stick to during this Ramadan.

Of course we must remember that we have to accomplish our obligatory actions, which is salat (prayer) and sawm (fasting).

But why should we keep these goals for Ramadan? Why shouldn’t we just lay on the couch all day watching TV or playing video games? Why should we keep goals if I’m fasting anyways?

We must learn to not be like the hypocrites, that are a certain way with certain people, and then are different when they are alone and no one is watching. Also, we must remember what is said in the Qur’an:

Whoever brings a good deed shall have ten times the like thereof to his credit, and whoever brings an evil deed shall have only the recompense of the like thereof, and they will not be wronged [al-An’aam 6:160].

So if our good deeds are multiplied by ten during any time of the year, imagine the reward we will get out of them if we accomplish good deeds in Ramadan! Subhanallah. This verse is also a sign of mercy from Allah (swt), as he does not multiply our evil deeds, but does so only with our good deeds.

  • Goal # 1: Read the entire Qur’an

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The first and foremost goal we should all set for ourselves this Ramadan is to read the Qur’an. As I mentioned in my previous article, Ramadan is not about fasting, but instead it’s about the Qur’an. If we keep it a habit to read the Qur’an during Ramadan, we will seek the guidance of the Qur’an after this month as well.

Reading the entire Qur’an during Ramadan is also Sunnah. The sahaabah (followers of the Prophet salalahu alayhi wa salaam) would read the Qur’an a great deal during Ramadan. For example, some would even complete the Qur’an every seven nights, and during Ramadan every three nights, and then every two nights during the last ten days of Ramadan.

So if they could complete the Qur’an in this time period, why can’t we complete one reading of the Qur’an in an entire month?

There is great benefit in the reading of the Qur’an. At-Tirmithee states:

Whoever reads a letter from the Book of Allah, he will have a reward. And that reward will be multiplied by ten.

Also, the Qur’an will intercede for us on the Day of Judgement. The Prophet (saws) said:

The Qur’an is an intercessor, something given permission to intercede, and it is rightfully believed in. Whoever puts it in front of him, it will lead him to Paradise; whoever puts it behind him, it will steer him to the Hellfire.” [An authentic hadith found in At-Tabaraanee, on the authority of ‘Abdullaah ibn Mas’ood]

There are many more benefits on reading the Qur’an. The reasons to read it this Ramadan are more than enough.

  • Goal # 2: Memorize an entire Surah

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I had mentioned this on my previous article, and it is a goal I plan to accomplish. A great way to help you stick to it is by finding yourself a friend that can help you achieve this challenge.

One way I learn things by memory is by reciting it about 8 or more times until I can finally recite it without having to look at it. I gues this is because I have photographic memory and everything I see I will remember. If you are someone that learns faster by hearing it, then playing it on your iPod or phone as many times as possible will help you memorize it.

Start by learning one ayat per day. As you advance throughout the month, remember to always recite the previous ayats as to not forget them.

  • Goal # 3: Read a book of beneficial knowledge this Ramadan

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My final goal is to read a book that will help me be a better Muslim. A good book can be 40 Hadiths on the Islamic Personality by Shaykh ‘Alee Hasan ‘Alee ‘Abdul Hameed. If you read one hadith every day, reflect on it, and think about how you can practice this in your daily life, the benefits of it will be more than beneficial for you.

Again, I recommend you find someone that you can share this with you. Whether it be your husband, a sister or a family member that can help you, you will both be getting the rewards out of it and benefiting one another insha’Allah.

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I know the list is rather short, but it is better to stick to short, simple goals than to create a huge list of things that you won’t be able to achieve and end up feeling bad with yourself. The following hadith also explains the virtues of doing something consistently.

Indeed, the Mother of the Believers `A’ishah (may Allah be pleased with her) narrates that “the most beloved action to Allah’s Apostle was that which is done continuously and regularly” (Sahih Bukhari, Book #76, Hadith #469).

Insha’Allah this was beneficial for you. If you have any other goals please add them to the list on the comment section and share with other your goals for this Ramadan.

May Allah bless us this Ramadan. Ramadan Mubarak!

Chao

Final Tips for Ramadan…

9 Jul

As-salaam alaikum everyone.

So the month of Ramadan has finally come – Alhamdulillah! – and insha’Allah you are more than prepared to take on this wonderful opportunity of mercy, forgiveness, and love from Allah (subhana wa ta’aala).

It seems like we were all expecting the month to begin tomorrow, July 9th, but as the moon was not sighted in Saudi Arabia, they have informed us that it will begin on Wednesday. In other words, Ramadan shall begin tomorrow night, with the first taraweeh prayers and the fasting will initiate on Wednesday insha’Allah. This has been confirmed in Costa Rica, so I’m not sure what the situation may be in your country.

Just a few tips to keep us motivated before we begin our fasting, and that insha’Allah we can take advantage of all the blessings given during Ramadan.

  • Don’t think about the fact that you’re hungry all the time.

I put this one up first because I know that many people will be thinking more on what’s not inside their belly than on more important matters. Not only will this make us waste valuable and precious time thinking and whining about our own selves than on the Qur’an, but also it will feed your ego. When you’re constantly thinking I am hungry, I am thirsty, I am sleepy, I, I, I… your unconsciously feeding your ego and distancing yourself from Allah (subhana wa ta’aala).

Remember the 800 million people on the face of this planet that don’t even have clean, fresh water, that can’t even have a bite to eat sometimes even during the whole day. When you are fasting, remember to make du’a for those that need it the most; for the hungry, the poor, the sick and those more in need of Allah’s mercy than us.

At least you’ll be able to eat something tonight, what about those millions that can’t? Take advantage of this sacred month and make du’a.

  • Divide the Qur’an up during the day instead of reading it in one sitting.

It’s easier to jog a mile every morning than to wake up one day and jog 10 miles. Not only will it be exhausting to read one juz or section of the Qur’an after a long day, but also you won’t be able to reflect on it sufficiently. If you divide the reading of the Qur’an during the day, you will be able to reflect more on what you read, think more about it and act upon the teachings of the Qur’an. Divide it up in a way that you read approximately 5 pages before salat, and 5 pages after each salat. That way you will be able to finish the entire Qur’an throughout the day, and reading 5 pages of Qur’an isn’t a whole lot.

If you work or are busy with your studies, then read some before starting your day (so that you can act upon it and reflect), during lunch break, and some more after work or school. Finally, save a good chunk of the juz for the night, when you’re relaxed and calm with your thoughts.

  • Make a goal to learn one new surah this Ramadan.

Whether it be big or small, the important thing is that you memorize it, know what you’re saying and stick to your task. Remember that the Prophet (salalahu alayhi wa’salaam) says that Allah (aza wajal) loves those that do something, no matter how small it may be, but are consistent on it. A sister and I have decided to memorize Surah Al Mulk, which is composed of 30 ayats, one for each day of Ramadan. If you’d like to join the challenge with us you are more than welcomed to, and if you can find a friend to take the task with you, that would be even better so that you can help each other out insha’Allah.

  • Remember why you are fasting.

Are you fasting to lose a few extra pounds on you? To quit your smoking habit or chill more on the amount of coffee you drink? Because everyone else is doing it and you don’t want to feel left out? If your reason for fasting is everything BUT to please Allah (swt), then your intentions are all upside down. Remember why Allah prescribed fasting for us, remember those that have no food on their plates, remember that Ramadan is a month in which we come closer to Allah and not distance ourselves from our Rabb, the Creator of the Heavens and the Earth, of our Sustainer, of our Lord. When you know exactly why you are fasting and have the good intention to, everything else will be easy for you insha’Allah.

  • Ramadan is not about fasting, it is about the Qur’an.

There are those that cannot fast, such as the sick, the poor, women that are pregnant or breastfeeding, etc. However, are these people exempt from the mercy and forgiveness of Allah during this month? Of course they aren’t. Even if we are fasting and have the health and possibilities to, Ramadan is not just a month of fasting. It was the month in which the Qur’an was first revealed to Prophet Muhammad (saws), and we must learn to make this month about the Qur’an and not about the fasting prescribed in it. Of course it is a huge factor that is part of the month, but truly the treasure in this month is the Qur’an itself and we must learn to meditate, study and actually sit down and read the Qur’an!

Ramadan Mubarak copy

So those were my simple yet informative tips for you before Ramadan begins. Insha’Allah you will benefit from them.

Just a heads up, this Ramadan since it is my first (Subhanallah for new reverts!), I’ve decided to share my experiences and stories along my Ramadan this year through here. It’s very important to keep a journal if you are new to fasting so that you can help yourself through the month. I encourage each and every one of you to keep a journal for Ramadan, to write in it and to save this so that you can look back at it throughout the years and remember your first, second, or any numbered Ramadan. 🙂

May Allah grant you guidance, wisdom and knowledge this Ramadan and the many months to come. May Allah (aza wajal) strengthen your emaan and bless your families, friends, and loved ones this Ramadan insha’Allah. Ameen.

Chao.

Ramadan is just 1 week away! Why fast?

1 Jul

For the Body

(Part Two of Two)

 RamadanImage2

As-salaam alaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh. Just a little less than a month ago I wrote the first part of this mini-series, and I feel like it was just yesterday I was putting the post up. Time flies by so quickly, subhanallah.

Finding information about some of the health benefits for fasting was a a bit harder than I thought, since there is so much controversy out there in regards to fasting in general.Some non-Muslims believe fasting is bad for your body, and others consider it to be beneficial. So it took me a while to finally gather up authentic, valid websites and documents that could help us benefit from them.

In the end, Allah is Allah. He is the Creator of the Universe, the Creator of the Earth, of you and me and of every single thing we can see. So who are we to judge whether or not something Allah ta’aala, the most Beneficent, the most Merciful, has prescribed for us?

Ramadan is the (month) in which was sent down the Qur’an as a guide to mankind also clear (Signs) for guidance and judgment (between right and wrong). So everyone of you who is present (at his home) during that month should spend it in fasting but if anyone is ill or on a journey the prescribed period (should be made up) by days later. Allah intends every facility for you. He does not want to put you to difficulties. (He wants you) to complete the prescribed period and to glorify Him in that He has guided you; and perchance ye shall be grateful.

(2:185) Qur’an

Some articles get into heated debates about the negative side effects for the elder, for women that are breast feeding, and so on. Alhamdulillah! Allah has made fasting obligatory, except for those that cannot perform fasting, including the elder, the ill, women that are pregnant, breastfeeding and so on. If only we knew how easy Allah wants this Holy month to be for us, we would realize how Just Allah ta’aala is.

The importance here is how we can benefit from this month. I strongly believe the true benefits are for our soul. Health benefits are additional, and you shouldn’t fast for anything else that isn’t for the sake of Allah.

Muslims fast for the tawqaa (God-consciousness, piety, fear of Allah) we have towards our Creator. When you fast, you realize you have nothing without Allah. It’s also to help you remember the poor, those that are in difficult situations and that cannot have even a drop of water to drink throughout the day.

So let’s see some health benefits that come from fasting during Ramadan.

Leaving poor habits behind

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One of the preparations for Ramadan is to leave any bad habits behind. This can include anything from smoking, to watching too much television, to eating too much fast food.

How many times have we gorged ourselves with food out of anxiety, or have led ourselves to obesity or other health conditions because of our poor diet? When was the last time you committed yourself to actually stop smoking and spend that money on something beneficial for yourself?

The truth is that we as humans will fall into bad habits constantly. From stuffing ourselves with food, to not drinking enough water daily, to smoking, to any other bad habit that harms our body.

This also includes actions that don’t benefit us, besides dietary ones. For example, watching too much television, playing too many video games, being on the Internet for too long and other time consuming things that will limit us from performing beneficial actions. These can include reading and studying the Qur’an and Sunnah, watching videos that can help strengthen our emaan, spending time with our friends and family, and others.

Ramadan is a month of self-restraining and also of self-training our body and mind to control these needs inside us. As it says in the Qur’an:

O ye who believe! fasting is prescribed to you as it was prescribed to those before you that ye may (learn) self-restraint.

(2:183) Qur’an

I strongly believe Ramadan is a month of benefit for our health, as it helps us cleanse our bodies and have awareness of what it’s like to be hungry and thirsty and not be able to have food or water for long periods. It’s not the same to feel empathy for someone that is going through hunger, then to actually go through hunger yourself and realize how important it is to help others.

Alhamdulillah that we have such a beautiful month to make us realize these things and learn to control our desires and needs.

Body Cleansing

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Ramadan has so many benefits, so this is why I decided to divide this article in two: one for the soul and one for the body. You can read my article For the Soul here.

Not only do we restrain from foul language, learn to help the needy and understand what our true intentions are as humans during Ramadan, but it is also a month where our body can take a break from all the bad things we’ve put it in.

If you’re someone that likes to eat tons of fast food, or fried foods, your digestive system will finally be able to cleanse itself.

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Anas b. Mâik narrates that Allah’s Messenger (peace be upon him) used to break his fast with fresh dates before going to prayer. When fresh dates were unavailable, he would break his fast with dried dates. When dried dates were unavailable, he would take a few sips of water.

[Sunan Abî Dâwûd (2356)]

It is Sunnah (the prophetic way) to break your fast with dates or water if you can’t find dates. Also, for your suhoor or early morning breakfast just before praying fajr, it is recommended to have a balanced, healthy meal full of proteins and vitamins, to stay away from fried foods and salty food such as cheese as they will make you thirsty, to not drink tea as it will make you want to go to the bathroom too often, and to drink at least 2 cups of water or more so that your body remains hydrated during the day.

Ramadan should not be a month to make diets, or to lose weight as some people consider it to be. Also, it shouldn’t be a month where you sleep all day and wake up at night to break your fast. Not only is this incorrect since you should be spending as much time possible reading Qur’an and remembering why we fast, but it will also make you gain weight.

We must remember that fasting in the month of Ramadan is the month for Allah (subhana wa ta’aala).

Imam al-Sadiq (A) said:

“God-Almighty said: ‘ Fasting is for Me and I bestow its reward upon the fast observer.”‘

(Wasail al-Shi’a, vol. 7, p-290)

Let’s also remember that fasting is a benefit for us, and not a burden for our ummah. During the month of Ramadan, the gates of heaven are opened and the gates of hell are closed, as is mentioned by the Prophet Muhammad (salalahu alayhi wa salaam).

The Holy Prophet (S) has said:

“The Fasting is a shield for protection against Hell’s fire.”

(Wasail al-Shi’a, vol. 7, p-289)

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May Allah guide us in this Holy Month that is soon to come. May our hearts be full of emaan and tawqaa, and may we always worship Allah ta’aala in any circumstance we may be, as He is the all Hearer, the all Knower, and the only one that can hear and answer our prayers. Ameen.

And Allah truly knows best.

Chao

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The Prophet (peace be upon him) said: “The child of Adam fills no vessel worse than his stomach. Sufficient for the child of Adam are a few morsels to keep his back straight. If he must eat more, then a third should be for his food, a third for his drink, and a third left for air.” [Sunan al-Tirmidhî (2380) and Musnad Ahmad (17186) and authenticated by al-Albânî in Sahîh al-Jâmi`]

Ramadan is just a month away! Why fast?

9 Jun

For the Mind and Soul

(Part One of Two)971674_380318762074924_544895805_n

As-salaam alaykum everyone. As a recent convert (Allahu Akbar) I’ve been thinking about Ramadan these days more than ever; what will it be like? Will my body last an entire month of fasting? How can I make this experience even more profitable?

I’ve been looking around some website and books on Ramadan, including Hadiths and quotes from the Qur’an. The benefits of Ramadan are just so many Alhamdulillah! Although we may not see them.

So I’ve decided to write a quick post on some of the benefits of this sacred month, not just physically, but mentally the amount of blessings and good things come out of it insha’Allah.

There is a great reward for those who fast

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Abu Huraira, radhiya Allahu `anh reported:

The Prophet said, “(Allah said), ‘Every good deed of Adam’s son is for him except fasting; it is for Me. and I shall reward (the fasting person) for it.’ Verily, the smell of the mouth of a fasting person is better to Allah than the smell of musk.” [Bukhari]

Allah, the Most High, the Most Beneficent, will reward a person that fasts for His sake only. Think about it. It is indeed a sacrifice. I don’t think fasting is all that easy, given the many hours without food or water. Insha’Allah there will be reward in our fasting and Allah will accept it.

Our supplications are granted

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Abu Hurairah reported that the Prophet, salla Allahu alaihi wa sallam, said: “There are three people whose supplications are not rejected: the fasting person when he breaks the fast, the just ruler and the supplication of the oppressed”. [Tirmithi, Ibn Majah and Ibn Hibban]

Our dua’s are accepted when we indulge in this action intended only for the sake of Allah. We must remember constantly why we are fasting, for what purpose we are doing so and to always thank Allah (subhana wa ta’aala) for giving us the strength and patience to fast.

Just think for a minute how many people out there starve to death because they can’t eat even a loaf of bread or drink a drop of pure, clean water. Think how privileged you are as a Muslim to be able to fast! So many people don’t have food at their tables, and cannot have this “luxury” of fasting for the sake of Allah.

It is a means of forgiveness for us

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Abu Huraira narrated that Allah’s Messenger said : “Whoever observes fasts during the month of Ramadan out of sincere faith, and hoping to attain Allah’s rewards, then all his past sins will be forgiven.” [Bukhari]

Subhanallah, how merciful our Rabb truly is. If you fast just 30 days of the 365 days of the year, with devotion, purity in your heart and sincerity, Allah will forgive any sins you have had in your past. Whether you are a new revert – like myself – or you have grandchildren and have retired, it is never too late to ask Allah for forgiveness and to repent to our Lord, to the Creator of the Heavens and the Earth. May Allah always guide us.

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Prepare-for-Ramadan-ProductiveMuslim

So these were the brief benefits that we have when fasting during Ramadan. Imagine how wonderfully merciful and forgiving our Lord is that He has given us this “tool” or action to use for our own benefit, and of course always for the sake of Allah.

You won’t find these benefits in other religions. They have deviated from the straight path of monotheism – Judaism and Christianity – and now follow practices that were never accepted during the time of the Prophets (peace be upon them all). We as Muslims are benefited in so many ways and take them for granted, that we don’t even have time to sit down and think about this and thank Allah (swt) for all that He has given us.

Insha’Allah I’ll be writing about the physical benefits of fasting during the month of Ramadan in a new post. So keep tuned for a new article on how not only your mind, but your body can benefit from this sacred and blessed month of Ramadan.

Allahu Akbar. May Allah safeguard us from Shaytaan, may Allah reward us and may Allah protect us and guide us from any evil. Ameen Rabb.

And Allah, our Lord, most Beneficent and most Merciful, knows best.

Chao.